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Join us for Trojan’s Trek Veterans’ Support Walk.

On Sunday October 30th, join us for the Trojan’s Trek Veterans’ Support Walk.

Walk, run or roll around the River Torrens, raise money for veterans and be in the running to win some great prizes!

Free parking, partners and pets welcome, coffee, sausage sizzle & BIG Raffle draw

– $100 Cash prize for first male and first female across the line
– $200 Cash prize for first team of 3 across the line, and
– $50 Cash x 2 spot prizes

Read more

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2016 QLD Trojan’s Trek – Men Outcome Data Report

There were eleven participates in the 2016 QLD Men’s Trojan’s Trek. For the purpose of this report, their questionnaire responses on four measures (Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale -DASS21, General Self- Efficacy Scale, Life Satisfaction Scale and the Positive and Negative Interactions Scale, See Table 1) were scored and analysed to measure quantitative change in mental health and wellbeing indicators from Day 1 and Day 6.

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All of the participants (100%) showed a positive change between Day 1 and Day 6 on their total DASS21 scores (reduction in scores for depression, anxiety and stress). All but one participant showed an increase in self-efficacy.

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Overall life satisfaction improved for all participants, and all showed an increase in satisfaction with mental health and sleep. Nine of the eleven participants (82%) showed an increase in satisfaction with feeling part of the community; the other three participants’ results remained stable. Ten of the eleven participants showed an increase in perception of positive interactions with friends and family, and increase in positive perception of spouse relationships was seen for all participants in a relationship. Satisfaction with relationships with children improved for seven of the eleven participants, while two remained stable. Results for each measure are outlined below in greater detail.

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Of note, five participants showed clinically significant reduction in all areas measured: stress, anxiety and depression severity. A sixth person showed significant reduction in stress severity, and another showed reduction in depression to clinical levels and another two participants showed significant reductions in both depression and stress, as highlighted in Table 2.

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On average, participant scores changed from severe anxiety, stress and depression on Day 1, to normal level anxiety, stress and depression scores by Day 6. At Day 1 scores were well above the average for the general population and by Day 6 became well below the average, see Table 3.

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Self-efficacy
As outlined in Figure 2, ten participants showed an increase in their self-efficacy scores and one participants’ scores remained stable. The average self-efficacy score was similar to that of the general population at Day 1, and above the general population at Day 6, see Table 4.

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Life Satisfaction
Overall satisfaction with life increased from Day 1 to Day 6 for all participants, and satisfaction increased in all areas measured; see Table 5. Participants’ life satisfaction in all areas was below that of the general population at Day 1, and above that of the general population at Day 6. Selected results for life satisfaction are shown in Figure 3; ten participants experienced an increase in overall life satisfaction between Day 1 and Day 6, nine participants showed an increase in satisfaction with mental health, and ten showed an increase in feeling part of the community and increased satisfaction with sleep.

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Relationships
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On average, perception of positive interactions with friends, family and spouses increased between Day 1 and Day 6. This scale (the Positive and Negative Interactions Scale) measures participants’ perception of how well they feel their relationships are going. Taking results from the Life Satisfaction Questionnaires, all participants who had a spouse indicated improvement with their satisfaction with their relationship except for one participant whose scores remained high and stable. Seven participants showed improvement in satisfaction with their relationship with their children, with two participant’s scores remaining stable and two others showing a slight score reduction, see Figure 4.

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References
DASS21: Lovibond, S. & Lovibond, P. (2004). Manual for the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (2nd Ed). University of New South Wales: Sydney.
Positive and Negative Interactions Scale: Schuster T. L., Kessler, R.C., & Aseltine, R. H. Jr (1990). Supportive interactions, negative interactions and depressed mood. American Journal of Community Psychology, 18, 423-438.
Self-Efficacy Scale: Schwarzer, R., & Jerusalem, M. (1995). Generalized Self-Efficacy scale. In J. Weinman, S. Wright, & M. Johnston. Measures in health psychology: A user’s portfolio. Causal and control beliefs. 35- 37. Windsor, England: NFER-NELSON.
Life Satisfaction Scale information: Australian Centre for Posttraumatic Mental Health (2010, February). Evaluation of Trojan’s Trek: Final report. Retrieved from http://www.trojanstrek.com/wp- content/uploads/2011/04/Trojans-Trek-Final-Report-2010.pdf
Note: See Participant Snapshot for an overview of where areas of change were for each participant.

Data analysis and report completed by Kendall Bird for Trojan’s Trek

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VETERANS’ SUPPORT WALK 2015

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A beautiful day greeted the 200 plus dogs crowd which gathered on the banks of the Torrens Lake on 25 Oct to take part in the Veterans’ Support Walk.

 This year the day was organised by Reuben Vanderzalm from Adelaide Exercise Physiology assisted by some of his staff and a few other volunteers. Thanks Reuben and company.  

After parking of the parade ground the crowd waited patiently for the start while listening to some interesting and funny commentary from Peter Goers.  A number of serious runners were among those gathered, looking for a share of  the cash prizes on offer.  

The Veterans Rowing Club catered for those with a need for a morning coffee while the MFS through David Gorham worked frantically to set up the BBQ which happened to coincide with an emergency response in the city. And a close thing it was too with the first batch of snags rolling off the barby as the quickest groups completed the 5km course.  

Winners for the day were:
1st male Lauchie Hennig,
1st female Zhali Clarke,
1st Team 
Steve, Lindi and Mike and the random $50 winners were Jeanette Mossop (who handed her winning back), and Wendy Turner.

A number of raffle winners also departed smiling.  The day will clear in excess of $14.5K which is a great effort.  

Thanks to all those who gave support to the day.

EDEN HILLS PROBUS CHIP IN

A part of community awareness, Moose Dunlop OAM and James Paterson,
a veteran of the Iraq war, responded to an invitation to address the club on 12 October.

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A large group of about 55 listened to the Probus member Tom Pearce thanks Moose for his address presentation and to James personal experience with stress illness and his recovery.

The number of insightful and astute questions which followed indicated a high level of interest in the approach taken by the foundation.